A Blog Update

In Evidence in Education by Alex Quigley0 Comments

Maintaining a regular blog and completing the day job is difficult work. I’ve always enjoyed composing a new blog in the corners of evenings, when the ‘real work’ is finished, to give me a fresh perspective and give myself an eagle eyed view of my own thinking. In recent weeks, my blog has ground to a halt, but for positive reasons.

In the main, I have been writing a great deal for our new Huntington Research School website and I thought that regular viewers of my blog might be interested in giving them a read:

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Biased…who? Me?’ This blog has its origins in some staff training, with the topic being our unconscious bias. Our all-too-human biases permeate our role in the classroom, from marking student’s work, to employing new colleagues. The blog includes a handy short video from The Royal Society.

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‘What can we learn from Dweck’s ‘Growth Mindset’ theory?’ Schools have a predilection for fads. Perhaps it is because we are short on time, with a need for quick supports, or maybe we need to be better armed to challenge the many edu-salespeople that knock on our door. This blog reflects upon the recent challenge to Carol Dweck’s theories, with an appeal not to chuck out three decades worth of research because we have launched into ‘growth mindset’ and it inevitably failed to provide a quick-fix.

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‘Developing School Research-leads’ One of the training courses for our new Research School work is training school leaders to engage in evidence-based practice. The leadership role of the Research-lead is a new and developing one. This blog looks at the role and asks the fundamental question: ‘what can research evidence do for us?’

Alas, my half-term is not until next week, so I hope to refresh and write some new blogs in the break.

In the meantime, do follow our Huntington Research School articles HERE, with interesting responses to new research (like this one by Jane Elsworth on gender and homework, or this one on the research evidence on CPD by David Weston). There is also information about our training, such as our exciting ‘Leading Learning‘ training and our Leading TAs for Maximum Impact‘.

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