Comments

  1. These top tens are Tops. Thanks to all who did them.

  2. I keep having to look up DIRT – an acronym that I hadn’t come across until recently.
    I’d add that the quality of the questions is crucial Wiliam (2011): “sharing high quality questions may be the most significant thing we can do to improve the quality of student learning.” (Embedded formative assessment p. 104)

    and also remember Graham Nuthall’s finding that much peer assessment is wrong!

    1. Author

      Ha, yes. I think Nuthall is spot on in many cases where it is poorly implemented. I think it is a useful tool when done well, but it should be third in priority after teacher & self-assessment. Perhaps it has as much value in simply exposing students to more models; asking questions of their own understanding etc.

      DIRT is a handy shorthand I find.

      1. Yes, peer assessment perhaps of as much value to the assessor as to the assessed. Probably very difficult to research that.

  3. These are great tips. Thanks for bringing them together like this. One question, could you help me understand how the “Now try… Explain why…” strategy works by providing a little example of when/where we could use it? thanks

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  8. Any chance you could make public the other ‘Top Tens’ please? At the moment, the link diverts to a Huntington log-in page. I’d love some more of that wisdom!

    Thanks

    1. Author

      Yes – having issues with permissions on the site. They used to be available, whilst we could protect private posts with video on etc. but there is an issue. Trying to fix at the moment.

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